Hydration: How Much Is Too Much Water?

For years the military has been at the fore-front of experiments using humans and their recent tests on hydration are following suit. The April 2009 study examined volunteers in a laboratory "under varying conditions of work intensity and duration, environmental conditions such as temperature and humidity, and types of clothing." Some of these variable were chosen in order to better refine, and perhaps replace, the formula that has been used since 1982 to determine sweat rate and water needs. Water accounts for a large percentage of the military's cost when sending soldiers overseas. They must take into account it's price, storage, piping, distribution, sourcing, etc so honing in on the needs is paramount to a successful mission. This new formula shows promise at being more accurate and allows for water needs to be estimated for a person working 8 hours vs the old standard of 2 hours. Technology has brought about changes in clothing that helps soldiers with temperature regulation and thus changes their sweat rate and the amount of water they need to stay hydrated. Early indicators show the new formula to be accurate...

Hydration To The Rescue

Athletes, people trying to lose weight, and even the general public are instructed to ensure high levels of hydration through out the day. Ingesting non-diuretic and non-damaging (ie alcohol) fluids help the body to maintain normal function of the organs, encourages homeostasis within all systems of the body, and keep the physiological stress of the tissues at a lower level. Fluids provide a sensation of fullness (one of the reasons they benefit weight loss), and also encourage mental alertness. People who struggle to get through the day (headaches, hunger pangs, fatigue) are often alleviated by increasing the intake of fluids. Thirst has been said to be a poor indicator of hydration because by the time the thirst mechanism is activated, it is too late. Urine color has shown to be a better indicator where lighter urine color (lemonade-like) is ideal versus a darker color (apple juice color). Note that some vitamins and foods will have an effect on color regardless of exertion and fluid intake.

Hydration's Effect On Performance

Researchers from theĀ U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine reveal interesting findings relating to hydration, and performance in...